Stitching project completed!

I have now finished stitching the project I was working on. It is not as large as I had originally anticipated. Mainly due to the fact that I ran out of wool threads in the colours I needed. Still got plenty of yellows, reds, orange and greens, but these did not fit into my colour scheme. Will have to use them for another project. Here is the finished piece.IMG_1873

It is still a square, just not as large as anticipated. It is really just a largish sampler of diagonal stitches. One pleasing thing for me is that I finally got round to trying out some stitches for the first time. Some are very common, but new to me. The reversed sloping gobelin for example, which is in the middle of the outer layer. I also kind of adapted a straight stitch. This is the lozenge stitch, which is a vertical stitch in my stitch guide. Here I changed it to a diagonal stitch, which appears in two of the outer corners with the dark blue threads. The other outer corners feature a variation of the milanese stitch. Though here it just looks like a series of diagonal cushion stitches.

The real discovery for me was the nobuko stitch, which I found on needlepoint.about.com. The nobuko stitch comes in two variations, both of which I used on the project. The basic version consists of a short, one step diagonal stitch, followed by a longer, three step diagonal. This can be seen to the left of the central blue section in pink and purple. The variation is the double alternating nobuko stitch. The big change is that there are two of each step and alternate rows are stitched in reverse. This stitch appears to the right of the central blue section and is stitched in green and pink.

Overall I am quite pleased with the outcome, though as usual I have no idea what to do with the finished piece. Luckily it rolls up quite nicely. My next project is a complete change in both scale, fabric and thread. I plan to work on my second fabric postcard, using a 28ct Brittney fabric in pine green. Wish me luck!

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2 thoughts on “Stitching project completed!

  1. I really like your patchwork sampler, dear Bargellist (or may I call you Al?) – wouldn’t it cheer up a chair in the Scottish winter if it became the middle bit of a cushion cover, perhaps in cosy corduroy?

    And I’m interested to see the results of your Nobuko stitching. I’m getting to the end of a picture that a friend asked me to do for her, and I used the double alternating variation for the water in the foreground: the piece shows my friend and her rowing partner on the point of winning gold in their age group in last year’s national championships, and she wanted it as a birthday gift for her partner. So it had to be on a largeish scale, and their boat wouldn’t fit in, so I was stuck with a horizontal stripe from edge to edge, with two women sitting in it. The foreground water needed a lot of texture (waves, reflections) so that was the double alternating, and very wet and wavy it looks. And the background was going to be good old single Nobuko until I decided to experiment: it’s possible and even easy to make it alternate as well, so I still got the movement I wanted but on a smaller scale. It was the first time I’d Nobukoed anything, but it won’t be the last.

    All the best from South Africa

    • Hi Deborah, thanks for your comments. Nobuko is a lovely discovery. It has a woven look to it, so I guess perfect for sea. It is not just in winter that we can do with a bit of cheering up. Summer in Scotland can be a bit of a hit and miss affair, and you are welcome to call me Al. I’m in Sitges just now, so I am enjoying some welcome warm sunshine.

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